What Are Today’s Employment Perspectives Regarding Aging Workers?

More Aging Workers Are Staying and Re-entering the Workforce Cultural perspectives regarding aging workers may be changing. The following facts describe various social and economic influences over the past 50 years. Age and Work Force Factors in the 1960s Back in the 1960’s, the Wirtz Report revealed that age discrimination was prevalent: 50 percent of employers used age limits to deny jobs to workers who were 45 and older. Other differences existed as well. Men spent the majority of their careers working for one company, in one profession and retired at early ages with pensions. Slightly more than 33 percent of the workers at that time were women. Average life expectancies for men were age 67 and for women age 74. Age and Work Force Factors Today The work force in 2017 has more than doubled over what it was in the 1960s, which is now 50 years ago. Over the last 25 years the percentage of workers who are age 55 and older has doubled. More recently, the number of workers who are 65 and older who have stayed or re-entered the workforce is greater. The Bureau of Labor Statistics predicts that the percentage of workers between the ages of 65 to 74 and who are 75 and older will increase at the fastest rate, by 75 percent by 2050. In contrast, workers from the ages of 25 to 54 are only predicted to increase by two percent during this same period. More women at the age of 55 and older are expected to make up 25 percent of the women’s work force by 2024, which is double...

The Aging Workforce: What to Expect and the State of Age Discrimination

How Extensively Has Age Discrimination Changed in the Past 50 Years? Most employers are aware of the ADEA (Age Discrimination in Employment Act) passed in 1967. The law has been in existence for decades. What many employers may not be aware of is the fact that age discrimination continues to be an issue, and in some cases a growing issue. How likely are you to be sued for age discrimination? Are the statistics on your side or against you? Consider the following facts reported this year by the EEOC in a statement about the state of age discrimination and older U.S. workers. Age Discrimination Statistics Today More than 60 percent of workers surveyed in 2017 who were age 45 and older indicated they either noticed or experienced age discrimination in the workplace. Of the individuals in this group, 90 percent stated age discrimination was common. African Americans (77 percent) reported higher rates of age discrimination, followed by Hispanics (61 percent) and Whites (59 percent). More women than men said that older workers face age discrimination. Older workers in the technology sector indicated that 70 percent of those on IT staffs had observed or experienced age discrimination. More than 40 percent of older workers in the technology fields feared losing their jobs due to age. In a Forbes magazine article, the author commented about the EEOC’s report entitled “State of Age Discrimination Statement 50 Years After the ADEA.” The article said that since the 2009 Supreme Court ruling on the Case Gross vs. FB Financial Services, age discrimination has been much more difficult to prove in court. Types of reforms...